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AIRBUS AND BOEING REPORT JULY 2019 COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT ORDERS AND DELIVERIES
Monday, August 19, 2019
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500 test flights with updated 737 MAX software

Source: Boeing


500 test flights with updated 737 MAX software

Source: Boeing


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NEWTOWN, Conn. -- Boeing and Airbus delivered 19 and 69 commercial jets in July 2019 compared to 39 and 77 deliveries, respectively, in the same month last year. With 258 deliveries this year to date, Boeing is 159 shipments behind last year’s total for the first seven months of the year. Airbus has delivered a total of 458 jets from January to July compared to 380 during the same period last year. Boeing’s deliveries have taken a severe hit following the March 10 crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a 737 MAX, and the subsequent deliveries halt and grounding of the fleet. Boeing decided on March 14 to suspend all deliveries of 737 MAX jets. The crashes were with a high degree of certainty caused by the aircraft’s Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), which suddenly activated in response to erroneous angle of attack information. In 2018, Boeing delivered 806 jets (763 in 2017) with Airbus handing over 800 (718 in 2017).

In July, Boeing delivered two 737 NGs. Boeing is still producing 737 MAX jets at a reduced rate of 42 aircraft per month and thereby building up an inventory of aircraft ready to be shipped. During 2018, Boeing raised its 737 production rate to 52 and was planning a further increase to 57 per month from June this year. Producing the 737 MAX at a reduced rate will allow the company to prioritize additional resources to focus on returning the 737 MAX to flight. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has established a Boeing 737 MAX Joint Authorities Technical Review (JATR) comprised of a team of experts from the FAA, NASA and international aviation authorities. The review sessions commenced on April 29 and the JATR’s work is still ongoing. On May 16, Boeing announced that it had completed development of the updated software for the 737 MAX and that it had flown the aircraft with updated MCAS software for more than 360 hours on 207 flights. On May 23, the FAA held a full-day meeting with representatives from 33 global regulatory bodies to discuss the process for bringing the 737 MAX back into service. On June 26, Boeing announced that the FAA has identified an additional requirement that it has asked the company to address as it updates the software and Boeing is now working to implement this. On August 5, Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg announced that the company has conducted almost 500 737 MAX test flights with updated software. According to the Associated Press, Boeing is currently working on new software for the 737 MAX that will use a second flight control computer to make the system more reliable. It remains unclear when the 737 MAX’s will return to service. Boeing’s best estimate is that the jet could be approved "early in the fourth quarter". The largest operator of the grounded jet, Southwest Airlines, has cancelled all 737 MAX flights through early January. To date, Boeing has delivered 387 737 MAXs of which 57 were delivered in Q1 2019. 256 737 MAX jets were delivered in 2018, up from 74 in 2017. In July, Boeing also delivered three 767s, two 777s and 12 787s. Boeing recently raised the monthly Dreamliner production rate to 14 aircraft. Boeing has handed over 90 787s year-to-date. The company delivered 145 787s in 2018, up from 136 in 2017. In connection with Boeing’s second quarter 2019 earnings report, Boeing CEO, Dennis Muilenburg, announced that Boeing plans to increase 777F production due to 777X delays. Boeing did not disclose by how much it plans to increase 777F production.

In July, Airbus delivered two A220s, 52 A320s (7 ceo / 45 neo), seven A330s, seven A350s, and a single A380. A total of 386 A320neo Family aircraft were delivered in 2018 up from 181 and 68 in 2017 and 2016, respectively. Later this year, Airbus expects to increase the A320 production rate to 60 aircraft per month. Furthermore, the company is targeting a raise to 63 jets per month from 2021. Airbus has delivered 60 A350s year-to-date and delivered 93 A350s in 2018 up from 78 in 2017 and recently increased the monthly production rate to 10. Airbus is considering a further increase up to 13 A350s per month but a date has yet to be announced. With the ramp up of A350 XWB deliveries combined with a higher A320 production rate, Airbus has nearly eliminated Boeing’s deliveries lead in recent years. Following the tragic 737 MAX events, in 2019, Airbus is almost certain to deliver more aircraft than Boeing.

Turning to the orders race, Boeing had a solid month in July logging 31 gross orders, all 777 and 787 wide-body jets (no cancellations => net of 31). Boeing’s July bookings included a total of 20 787 Dreamliners for Korean Air, including 10 787-9s and 10 787-10s. Korean Air committed to buying these aircraft at Paris Air Show in June and has now firmed up the order. In addition, an undisclosed customer ordered a single 787-8. Qatar Airways firmed up five 777 freighters (Paris commitment) with China Airlines firming up three (Paris commitment of six 777Fs). Finally, an undisclosed customer placed an order for two 777-300ERs. Year to date, Boeing has accumulated 139 gross orders (227 cancellations => -88 net new orders). For the full year 2018, Boeing booked 893 net new orders (1,008 gross orders).

In the orders race, Airbus had a disappointing month and booked 33 gross orders but, at the same time, reported 42 cancellations resulting in nine net cancellations. In July, Republic Airways has cancelled an order for 40 A220-300s. Airbus’ July orders were a mix of A320neo narrow-bodies and A330 and A350 wide-bodies. The largest orders were 20 A350-900s for Air China and eight A330-900s for Virgin Atlantic. The Virgin Atlantic order was announced at Paris Air Show. For 2019 to date, Airbus reports 246 gross orders (167 cancellations => net of 79). Of the cancellations, 31 were due to Emirates’ decision earlier this year to reduce its A380 order book. This subsequently forced Airbus to announce that it will cease A380 production in 2021. In 2018, Airbus landed a total of 747 net new orders (831 gross orders) thereby losing the 2018 orders race as Boeing had accumulated 893 net new orders. Airbus had retained an orders lead over its rival every year since 2012.

On July 31, 2019, Airbus backlog was 7,198 jets, of which 6,253 or 87% are A220 and A320ceo/neo Family narrow-bodies, not far below the company’s all-time backlog record high of 7,577 jets set in December 2018. By the end of July 2019, Boeing’s backlog (total unfilled orders after ASC 606 adjustments) was 5,745 aircraft (of which 4,547 or 80% are 737 NG/MAX narrow-body jets). Boeing’s all-time backlog high of 5,964 aircraft was set in August 2018. The number of Airbus aircraft to be built and delivered represents 9.0 years of shipments at the 2018 production level. In comparison, Boeing’s backlog would "only" last 7.1 years. This year to date, Boeing’s book-to-bill ratio, calculated as orders divided by deliveries, is negative. Airbus’ book-to-bill ratio is 0.17. In 2018, Boeing boasted a book-to-bill ratio of 1.11 with Airbus at 0.93. In 2017, Boeing booked 912 net new orders for a book-to-bill ratio of 1.20. That same year Airbus booked 1,109 net new orders for a book-to-bill ratio of 1.54.

2019 Forecast

Forecast International’s Platinum Forecast System® is a breakthrough in forecasting technology which - among many other features - provides 15-year production forecasts. The author has used the Platinum Forecast System® to retrieve the latest delivery forecasts and, for 2019, Forecast International’s analysts expect Boeing and Airbus to deliver 724 and 875 large commercial jets, respectively. The forecasted 2019 total for Boeing was 904 prior to the second 737 MAX crash and the subsequent grounding of the fleet and temporary cut in the production rate. These are the latest "live" forecast figures (adjusted frequently by our analysts as new information comes in). These figures are excluding militarized variants of commercial platforms such as Boeing’s P-8 Poseidon, KC-46 and KC-767 tankers, the C-40 and Airbus’ A330 MRTT tanker program.

Prior to the second 737 MAX crash, in connection with the release of its 2018 earnings report in late January, Boeing announced it was targeting between 895 and 905 commercial jet deliveries in 2019, a 12-13% increase from 2018. Boeing has yet to announce a revised figure and is likely awaiting the 737 MAX’s return to service before providing an updated guidance. On February 14th, Airbus announced that it aims for 880 to 890 commercial aircraft deliveries in 2019, equal to a 10-11% increase from 2018.

Source:  Forecast International
Associated URL: forecastinternational.com
Author: K.Oestergaard, European Correspondent 

 
ATKINS TO COLLABORATE WITH AERALIS TO DEVELOP NEW SUITE OF TRAINING JET AIRCRAFT
Friday, August 16, 2019
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Source: Atkins


Source: Atkins


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LONDON -- Atkins, a member of the SNC-Lavalin Group, is collaborating with aircraft designer and manufacturer AERALIS to develop a new family of training jet aircraft using a patent-pending modular design.

Together, the organizations will design two types of modular aircraft - the Basic Trainer and the Advanced Trainer - which will provide training, from cadet to front-line pilot, for the most advanced combat aircraft systems currently in development.

Each aircraft will comprise a common core fuselage that will be fully adaptable using different wings and engines depending on the level of training being undertaken. It is expected that the acquisition and maintenance of the family of training jets will cost 30% less than a conventional flight training system thanks to the modular design affording an 85% commonality in aircraft parts.

Atkins will be advising on the design of the jets, using a digital twin to explore different design concepts for the fuselage and its interchangeable components.

Dave Clark, Aerospace & Defence Market Director at Atkins, said: "Our collaboration with Aeralis provides us with a great opportunity to help shape the development of cutting-edge aircraft design. Thanks to innovative tools such as a digital twin, we will be able to run virtual tests on the training jets before they are built to drive efficiencies and reduce the risks associated with aircraft design and production."

Tim Davies, Aeralis Strategy Director, added: "The AERALIS team are looking forward to working with Atkins to build modular aircraft using innovative design processes that will motivate a new generation of young people to train in aerospace engineering, manufacturing and STEM subjects as well as follow careers in aviation."

The training simulation that will be installed onto the training jets is currently being developed by Aeralis in partnership with Thales. Previously Atkins has also worked alongside Thales to deliver systems and safety assurance for the training centrifuge at the state-of-the-art fast jet pilot training facility at the Royal Air Force College in Cranwell.

Source:  Atkins
Associated URL: Click here to visit

 
FIRST BELARUSIAN SU-30SMS SPOTTED
Sunday, August 18, 2019
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Source: Irkut Corporation


Source: Irkut Corporation


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MINSK -- The first Su-30SMs for Belarus' Air Force has appeared.

Over the weekend, an image of the first two Belarusian Su-30SM fighter jets emerged on Russianplanes.net, a plane-spotting website. The photo, taken by Alexey Korshunov, showed one of the aircraft outside a plant owned by the Irkut Corporation, which manufactures the jet. Inside a hanger, another aircraft could be seen with Belarusian markings and the number 01.

Belarus expects to begin taking delivery of up to four of the fighter jets later this year. In 2017, Minsk inked a contract for the supply of a dozen jets, reportedly at a cost of around $600 million.

Russia's Federal Service for Military and Technical Cooperation told TASS Russian News Agency in May of this year that the deal was at the implementation stage, adding, "The aircraft will be delivered in strict compliance with the terms of the contract after advance payments from the Belarusian side are received."

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko had previously cricitized the pricetag, but the fact that the aircraft have been manufactured indicates that either payment has been provided, or Russia expects that the financial arrangements will be completed.

Source:  Izvestia
Associated URL: Click here to visit
Source Language: Russian

 

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