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NEW RUSSIAN MISSILE BOAT ENTERING STATE TRIALS
Monday, July 6, 2020
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Odintsovo will feature Pantsir-M naval air defense system

.Source: Rostec


Odintsovo will feature Pantsir-M naval air defense system

Source: Rostec


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MOSCOW -- A new Russian missile boat is entering state sea trials.

Speaking to Krasnaya Zvezda, the military's newspaper, Navy commander-in-chief Admiral Nikolai Yevmenov said, "The small missile ship Odintsovo is the first corvette armed with the Pantsir system. On June 30, its state trials began at the Baltic Fleet’s naval ranges." Odintsovo, of Project 22800, should be commissioned later this year into the Baltic Fleet.

Odintsovo is the first corvette to utilize the Pantsir-M, a naval version of the mobile ground-based air-defense system. The Baltic Fleet will receive another three missile boats from the class armed with the Pantsir-M, in addition to Sovetsk and Mytishchi, which have already been commissioned into service but do not have the air-defense system.

Project 22800 corvettes also feature the Kalibr-NK cruise missile and AK-176MA 76.2mm artillery weapons.

Separately, Admiral Yevmenov noted that the next frigate in Project 22350, named Admiral Kasatonov, should be commissioned into service later this month. He stated that the class would service as the basis for the Navy's ocean-going vessels in years to come, and confirmed that the warship design "will be further developed relative to some shipborne systems and armament."

Admiral Kasatonov is the second frigate of the class, behind Admiral Gorshkov. Several more are under construction.

The Pacific Fleet should soon receive its first Project 636.3 submarine, Admiral Yevmenov told Krasnaya Zvezda. The Pacific Fleet has six on order and the first, Volkhov, is nearly finished with testing. Its trials should conclude later this month.

Source:  TASS Russian News Agency
Associated URL: Click here to visit

 
PHILIPPINES GOVERNMENT APPROVES FUNDING FOR GBAD PURCHASE
Monday, July 6, 2020
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.Source: Rafael Advanced Defense Systems


Source: Rafael Advanced Defense Systems


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NEWTOWN, Conn. -- The Philippine government's Department of Budget and Management has signed off on a Special Allotment Release Order allowing for procurement of a ground-based air defense (GBAD) system for the Philippine Air Force (PAF). Funding allocated for the purchase amounts to PHP2.39 billion ($48.4 million).

The Philippines Air Force plans to procure the Israeli-made Spyder self-propelled surface-to-air (SAM) missile system produced by Rafael Advanced Defense Systems to meet its GBAD requirement.

The purchase by the Philippines is being made under the 15-year Revised AFP Modernization Program as part of its "Horizon Two" five-year (2018-2022) phase. The project had originally been expected to be undertaken during "Horizon One' (2013-2017) but was instead bumped back into the second acquisition phase.

The Rafael Spyder (Surface-to-air Python and Derby) air-defense system was selected by the Philippine Air Force (PAF) to meet its Ground Based Air Defense System (GBADS) requirement back in December 2018. The mobile system integrates both the short-range Python 5 and the medium-range Derby missiles into a four-tube slant launcher fitted on an ADS-MR 6x6 vehicle and supported by the Elta EL/M 2016 ATAR 3D surveillance radar affixed to the mobile command-and-control unit.

Source:  Janes
Associated URL: Click here to visit

 
RISK AVERSION IMPEDES HYPERSONICS DEVELOPMENT
Tuesday, June 30, 2020
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X-51A WaveRider Hypersonic Test Vehicle

.Source: US Air Force


X-51A WaveRider Hypersonic Test Vehicle

Source: US Air Force


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WASHINGTON -- Speeding ahead with the development of hypersonic weapons, both offensive and defensive, will require the Defense Department to look back to the 1960s - a time when it was far less risk-averse than it is now, the department's director of defense research and engineering for modernization said.

"We need to be less risk-averse. And that doesn't mean we seek to maximize risk. But it also means we're not afraid to take risks, or we're not afraid to fail, as long as they're what I term noble failures," Mark J. Lewis said during a discussion today with Rebeccah Heinrichs of the Hudson Institute in Washington.

The speed, maneuverability, and trajectories of hypersonic weapons will give whomever masters them first an advantage, Lewis said. A hypersonic weapon traveling at Mach 5, faster than around 3,800 miles per hour, he said, presents challenges to adversaries.

"That doesn't give your potential adversary a lot of time to figure out what you are, decide that you're coming, and then take some action," he said. "So, speed is essential."

But developing and delivering a hypersonic cruise missile or a hypersonic boost/glide system will take some time, he said. He said he expects the department to be able to deliver whatever systems are determined to be most useful "at scale" sometime around the mid-2020s. That's going to require the department to change the way it operates - to accept more risk in testing and development - much more so than what it's got a taste for now, Lewis said.

To illustrate, he contrasted development of the Air Force's X-51 program just 10 years ago, and the X-15 program during the 1960s.

The X-51 hypersonic aircraft did four test flights, Lewis said. It wasn't until the fourth that it had a truly successful flight. But the initial failures, and the amount of time in between test flights to determine what happened, presented problems.

For one, he said, between the first and second test flight - a span of more than a year - the original pilot for the B-52 "mother craft" that launched the X-51 had retired. At the same time, more than 70% of the ground crew associated with the first test flight was no longer around.

"We had a loss of expertise," he said.

The third test flight came more than 14 months after the second, and the final flight close to nine months after that. Fear of failure was a key factor in the slow movement, Lewis said.

"We had people in the program saying, 'Well, we can't fly that vehicle, because what if it fails?' I remember having these surrealistic conversations. ... If we don't, we paid for it," he said. "It's sitting in the hangar, why wouldn't we fly it? 'Well. [they said] if we fly it, if it doesn't work, then we're done.' We did finally fly it. But there was so much hand-wringing. There was so much worry about this, about what would happen if [it failed]. That kind of illustrates the situation we've gotten ourselves into."

The 1960s-era X-15 program, he said, was a remarkably different situation.

"The X-15 program flew 199 flights, roughly once every two weeks," he said. "When things went wrong, they figured out immediately what went wrong, and they got those vehicles back in the air."

While the loss of a fin on the X-51 program during its third test flight led to hand-wringing and fear, he said, the X-15 program managed to press on after researchers lost an entire aircraft, and even a pilot.

"They had one case where a vehicle landed hard, broke in half, and they said, 'Great - we wanted to make one a little bit longer anyway,'" he said. "They weren't afraid of failure. They even had a tragedy in the program. They lost one of the vehicles, they lost the pilot. It didn't end the program. So that's kind of the mindset that we're trying to get into."

Part of that will mean a lot of testing, Lewis said, and over the next four years, he expects as many as 40 different flight tests of hypersonic systems.

"We need to fly early. We need to fly often," he said.

A robust program with limited time between tests means there's less chance of losing talent and knowledge between tests, he noted.

"We learn as we're doing," he said. "We're not constantly relearning how to do what we used to know how to do. And that, I think is the secret. I think it's the path we're trying to get ourselves on."

Source:  U.S. Department of Defense
Associated URL: Click here to visit

 

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