Shopping Cart  |  Intelligence Center


HOME PRODUCTS & SERVICES MEDIA CENTER CONSULTING SERVICES DEMOS SALES OFFICES OUR COMPANY LOG IN

AEROSPACE & DEFENSE ELECTRONICS
AIRLINES, COMMERCIAL AVIATION & MAINTENANCE
AVIATION ENGINES, PROPULSION & AUXILIARY POWER UNITS
INDUSTRIAL & MARINE GAS TURBINES
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - ASIA, AUSTRALIA & PAC RIM/EURASIA
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - EUROPE
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - NORTH AMERICA
MILITARY AIRCRAFT
MILITARY VEHICLES, ORDNANCE, MUNITIONS, AMMUNITION & SMALL ARMS
MISSILES & MISSILE SYSTEMS
NAVAL SHIPS AND OPERATING SYSTEMS
NON-US AEROSPACE/DEFENSE COMPANIES & CONTRACTS
REGIONAL, BUSINESS & GENERAL AVIATION
ROTORCRAFT
SPACECRAFT, LAUNCH VEHICLES & SATELLITES
US AEROSPACE/DEFENSE COMPANIES & CONTRACTS
Drones and Unmanned Systems - Air, Sea, Land, Micro & Robot Systems
UTILITIES, ROTATING MACHINERY & POWER GENERATION

Spacecraft, Launch Vehicles & Satellites
 
SLS PROGRAM MAKES PROGRESS TOWARDS 2019 LAUNCH
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
Click image for a larger picture

Artist's rendition of SLS in the clouds

Source: NASA


Artist's rendition of SLS in the clouds

Source: NASA


Close
NEWTOWN, Conn. - The Space Launch System (SLS) is part of NASA's flagship program to revitalize deep space exploration. Despite the inspiring mission, the SLS has a troubled history and lacks a clear guide for future usage.

For much of the program's history, controversy surrounded the SLS. Even after a compromise was reached in the FY10 budget to fund both the SLS and commercial launch vehicles, NASA and Congress continue to battle over funding. Republicans in Congress may be placated by the decision by the new Trump administration to increase funding for the SLS, reducing some of the controversy going forward.

Even as the program faces the benefit of potentially moderating controversy, delays continue to mount. Originally planned to launch in 2017, the first launch was pushed back to late 2018. Even then, delays continued, pushing the first launch to 2019 at the earliest. Delays have been caused by problems with the development of the Orion service module as well as the SLS core stage. However, most engineers say that there was no single debilitating delay. Instead, many smaller problems have cascaded to produce large years-long delays.

Despite these problems, not all is bleak for the SLS. NASA completed the System Requirements Review and System Definition Review in July 2012. The SLS successfully passed its Preliminary Design Review in July 2013. Flight software and avionics were tested in December 2013. Booster avionics tests took place in April 2014, followed by forward skirt tests in May 2014. In July 2014, Boeing was awarded a $2.8 billion contract to develop the SLS core stage. The program completed the KDP-C in August 2014 and the Critical Design Review was completed in October 2015. Progress on the engines and upper stage also continues. Ground qualification testing for the SRB took place in March 2015 and June 2016, and the RS-25 underwent ground tests in 2015 and 2016, while the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) passed its preliminary design review (PDR) in January 2017.

NASA has also started to make progress on finding a role for the SLS as the agency lays out future exploration strategies. NASA would like to build a system of deep space transports that support a gateway near the Moon, which would serve astronauts and crewless missions to deep space. As the largest launch vehicle in government service, the SLS would play a major role building and supplying the deep space gateway.

The first SLS launch is now expected to take place in 2019. Another launch will occur in 2022, and launches will become more consistent after that, with a launch taking place about every other year throughout the 2020s and 2030s.

Source:  Forecast International
Associated URL: www.forecastinternational.com
Source Date: September 19, 2017
Author: B. Ostrove, Analyst 
Posted: 09/19/2017

 
 
SSL SELECTED TO HELP USAF TEST AND VALIDATE SCENARIOS FOR HOSTING PAYLOADS
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
Click image for a larger picture

SSL concept of GEO satellite with a hosted payload

Source: SSL


SSL concept of GEO satellite with a hosted payload

Source: SSL


Close
PALO ALTO, Calif. - SSL has been selected by Innoflight, Inc. to provide a high fidelity simulation environment for testing the security of hosted payloads on commercial satellites. The capability, which is being developed for the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) as part of its Secure IP Payload Accommodation Demonstration Project, will enable SMC to demonstrate cybersecure payload hosting scenarios, concepts of operation, and cybersecurity controls.

The capability will also demonstrate advanced, secure internet protocol connections between a government payload operations center and the hosted payload using the existing satellite operator’s networking infrastructure, eliminating the high cost of specialized space to ground communication systems.

Under a hosted payload scheme, a government will pay a commercial satellite operator to install a government-developed payload on board a commercially operated satellite. Hosted payloads offer promise to both the military and commercial satellite operators by providing a low-cost way to get military payloads into orbit while providing satellite operators with a ready source of cash.

A few hosted payload contracts have been signed, such as one between the U.S. Air Force and SES for the Commercially Hosted Infrared Payload (CHIRP) and another between the Australian Defence Force and Intelsat for a UHF payload. However, hosted payloads have not caught on as quickly as some in the industry had hoped. The government needs to establish funding sources, standardize business practices, and coordinate military and commercial timetables before hosted payloads are likely to gain acceptance.

SSL will use its experience building satellites that include hosted payloads to demonstrate secure interface platforms. These secure platforms to communicate with the hosted payload are extremely important for the DoD to be able to use the payload.

Source:  MDA Corp
Associated URL: http://mdacorporation.com/corporate/news-archive?article=pr2017091901
Source Date: September 19, 2017
Author: B. Ostrove, Analyst 
Posted: 09/19/2017

 
 
GALILEO SATELLITES SET TO FLY ON ARIANE 6
Tuesday, September 19, 2017
Click image for a larger picture

Artist's configuration of two Ariane 6 configurations

Source: ESA–David Ducros, 2017


Artist's configuration of two Ariane 6 configurations

Source: ESA–David Ducros, 2017


Close
PARIS - Four of the latest set of Galileo navigation satellites will be launched on Ariane 6 rockets. The agreement marks the first official contract between ESA and ArianeGroup to use the new launch vehicle.

The launches are scheduled between the end of 2020 and mid-2021, using two Ariane 62 rockets. The Ariane 62 is the smaller variant of the Ariane 6, utilizing two side-mounted boosters. The Ariane 62 will largely replace the Europeanized Soyuz in Arianespace's lineup of launch vehicles, making it well suited to carrying the 750-kilogram Galileo satellites to their orbits at 23,222 kilometers.

Increasing competition in the launch industry, particularly from U.S.-based SpaceX, is creating a need for change in the Ariane lineup. While the Ariane 5 currently used in Europe has a longer record of success than new entrants like SpaceX, the launch vehicle is much more expensive.

To improve their competitive standing, European nations have approved a number of changes to the launch industry. A new launch vehicle, called the Ariane 6, is being developed. It will be produced in two variants, the above mentioned Ariane 62 that will replace the Soyuz, and the Ariane 64, which will replace the Ariane 5. The two variants will have common components, increasing economies of scale and reducing production costs of each rocket.

Galileo satellites are being delivered under three contracts. The latest contract, signed in June 2017, enables ESA to reach its goal of operating a network of 30 full operational capability (FOC) satellites. All 30 FOC satellites are expected to be delivered by 2020. With an expected 12-year lifespan, aging, in-orbit Galileo satellites will start to need replacement early in the next decade. Replacement deliveries are expected to begin around 2023.

Source:  ESA
Associated URL: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Navigation/Galileos_set_to_fly_on_Ariane_6
Source Date: September 19, 2017
Author: B. Ostrove, Analyst 
Posted: 09/19/2017

 

NOTICE TO USERS

Warranty: Forecast International makes no guarantees as to the veracity or accuracy of the information provided. It warrants only that the information, which has been obtained from multiple sources, has been researched and screened to the best of the ability of our staff within the limited time constraints. Forecast International encourages all clients to use multiple sources of information and to conduct their own research on source data prior to making important decisions. All URLs listed were active as of the time the information was recorded. Some hyperlinks may have become inactive since the time of publication.

Technical Support: Phone (203)426-0800 e-mail support@forecast1.com

Subscription Information: Phone (203)426-0800 or (800)451-4975; FAX (203)426-0223 (USA) or e-mail sales@forecast1.com

Aerospace/Defense News Highlights is published by Forecast International, 22 Commerce Road, Newtown CT 06470 USA. Articles that list Forecast International as the source are Copyrighted © 2017. Reproduction in any form, or transmission by electronic or other means, is prohibited without prior approval from the publisher.

Forecast International invites all interested companies to submit their announcements and press releases for review and inclusion in our Intelligence Letters.

Contact: Ray Peterson, Director of Research
E-Mail: Ray.Peterson@forecast1.com
Phone: 800-451-4975
FAX: 203-270-8919



HOME PRODUCTS & SERVICES MEDIA CENTER CONTACT US PRIVACY STATEMENT TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Forecast International © 2017 22 Commerce Rd Newtown, CT 06470 USA Phone: 203.426.0800 Toll-Free: 800.451.4975 (USA & Canada) Fax: 203.426.0223 info@forecast1.com