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Rotorcraft
 
COLOMBIAN AIR FORCE TAKES DELIVERY OF EIGHTH UPGRADED ARPIA HELICOPTER
Thursday, November 16, 2017
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Colombian Air Force AH-60L Arpia

Source: Colombian Air Force


Colombian Air Force AH-60L Arpia

Source: Colombian Air Force


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BOGOTA - The Colombian Air Force has taken delivery of the eighth AH-60L Arpia IV, an upgraded version of the AH-60L Arpia. Delivery of the aircraft was reported by Infodefensa.com.

The Air Force is upgrading its fleet of 12 AH-60L IIIs to the new Arpia IV standard. The modernization includes the installation of a datalink, Toplite III electro-optical systems, ANVIS/HUD-24 helmet-mounted displays, four multifunctional displays to replace the analog systems in the cockpit. The Air Force is also replacing the Arpia III's GAU-19 12.7mm machine guns with a Nexter NC-621 20mm cannon pod and anti-tank SPIKE non-line-of-sight (NLOS) missile from Rafael Advanced Defense Systems.

Weapons trials began in 2013 and the SPIKE missiles were successfully integrated in November 2014. The first fully upgraded Arpia IV was presented in February 2015. The program is now almost complete, with eight of 12 delivered.

Source:  Infodefensa
Associated URL: http://www.infodefensa.com/latam/2017/11/14/noticia-colombianota1esprimicia-fuer
Source Date: November 16, 2017
Author: B. Ostrove, Analyst 
Posted: 11/16/2017

 
 
FOR THE FIRST TIME, ARMY SENSORS CAN DETECT AIRCRAFT DAMAGE AS IT OCCURS
Thursday, November 16, 2017
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Source: US Army


Source: US Army


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ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. - For the first time ever, a team of researchers successfully developed and tested networked acoustic emission sensors that can detect airframe damage on conceptual composite UH-60 Black Hawk rotorcraft.

Researchers with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the U.S Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center said their discovery opens up possibilities for new onboard features that could immediately alert the flight crew to the state of structural damage like matrix cracking and delamination as they occur, giving the crew greater opportunity to take corrective actions before catastrophic failure.

ARL has been studying several possible alternatives to rotorcraft airframe health monitoring. This effort, which began almost two years ago, makes a strong case for integrated real-time damage sensing methodologies on future airframe structures. The sensing method can be used to reliably detect and locate the initiation and growth of damage that may occur during service.

"Future Army airframe structures are required to be lighter, safer and ultra-reliable," said Dr. Mulugeta Haile, research aerospace engineer. "To achieve these the Army must adopt a combined strategy of implementing advanced structural design methods, improved structural materials and integrated damage sensing and risk prediction capabilities."

He said the team turned to acoustic emission tests because other methods such as ultrasonic and radiography require an external energy source in the form of a directed wave.

"The external energy has the undesirable effect of interfering with other systems of the aircraft. In addition, other methods are not as good as AE in detecting early damage," he said.

Acoustic emission sensing is a passive non-destructive technique for detection of damage in the very early stage, and long before the structure experiences catastrophic failure. Unlike other methods, Acoustic emission detects damage in real-time (or at the instant the damage is happening). The fact that AE is passive means that it does not require an external energy to detect damage. It relies on the energy that is initiated within the structure, Haile explained.

"The novelty of the current work is that we introduced several new concepts on wave acquisition control and signal processing to recover damage related information in networked acoustic emission sensors," Haile said. "The Eureka moment was when the sensing network consistently identified and located the initiation and progression of damage during a prolonged fatigue test that lasted over 200,000 cycles -- a feat that has never been achieved before."

The ARL sensing network is composed of several lightweight transducers encapsulated in 3-D printed non-intrusive sensor mounts. Sensors of the network are optimally distributed in multiple zones to maximize coverage as well as probability of damage detection. The data acquisition process is embedded with a software controllable timing parameter to reject reflections of a direct wave, as well as waves coming from non-damage related events. Meanwhile, the signal processing algorithm is augmented with a layer of adaptive digital filters to minimize effects of signal distortion during location analysis.

Dr. Jaret Riddick, director of the Vehicle Technology Directorate, along with Haile, Nathaniel Bordick and other ARL partners, collaborated to elucidate detailed mechanisms for full-scale damage detection in complex rotorcraft structures using the distributed sensor architecture. Key to the technique is the development of signal distortion control parameters, acquisition timing control, and 3-D printed sensor capsules.

"The downtime due to routine inspection and maintenance represent the major fraction of the life cycle cost of Army platforms, because we are not using the platform and we have to pay for inspection, which in most cases reveals no damage. So the idea is to integrate a reliable damage sensing network and perform maintenance only when necessary," Riddick said.

Currently, the Army sustains its fleet using phase maintenance paradigm, which is a periodic calendar-based practice that requires inspection and maintenance at fixed time intervals. The process is highly inefficient, costly and entails extended downtime. The newly developed sensing network will enable condition-based maintenance or maintenance on demand. It has the potential to drastically cut the life cycle cost of Army vehicles. The work also supports the Army's long term vision of maintenance-free aircrafts.

"Large-scale AE monitoring is a data-intensive process with several million hits being received by each transducer per flight," Halle said. "This puts a higher load on the internal bus and circuitry of any data acquisition hardware. In general, most hits are not related to damage. Rather, they are noises from moving parts such as the clicking or rubbing noises of fasteners, panel connections, and vibrations from other non-damage related sources. Unwanted AE hits also arise due to reflections of an already received and processed AE wave. The challenge is to develop a system which is sensitive only to damage related hits and insensitive to all other hits."

"Most of the available AE-based structural health monitoring is for simple plate-like structures, despite most airframe structures not being simple plates," Bordick said. "Not much has been done on integrated full-scale airframe health monitoring using AE. The problem is quite complex. I'm glad that we were able to successfully develop and demonstrate the sensing network."

Source:  US Army
Associated URL: army.mil
Source Date: November 16, 2017
Author: T'Jae Ellis, ARL Public Affairs 
Posted: 11/16/2017

 
 
BELL BOEING V-22 OSPREY FLEET TOPS 400,000 FLIGHT HOURS
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
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Source: Boeing


Source: Boeing


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PHILADELPHIA - Boeing and Bell Helicopter Textron Inc. announced the Bell Boeing V-22 fleet of tiltrotor aircraft, including both CV-22 and MV-22 variants, has surpassed the 400,000 flight hour milestone.

The V-22 Osprey has been continuously deployed since entering service in 2007 with the United States Marine Corps (USMC) and the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) in 2009. The aircraft has seen extensive action in Afghanistan as part of Operation Enduring Freedom, in Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and as part of a U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force (SPMAGTF) supporting a long-range rapid reaction/crisis response force.

"As the number of flight hours indicate, the V-22 Osprey is a mature platform that projects a versatile mission capability for military operations as well as humanitarian relief efforts," said U.S. Marine Corps Col. Matthew Kelly, V-22 Joint Program manager.

MV-22B Osprey are operating around the globe today, transforming the way the USMC conducts assault support, humanitarian relief operations and the broad spectrum of SPMAGTF missions.

The Bell Boeing V-22 is continuing to achieve outstanding mission success, performing missions only capable with tiltrotor technology. Since entering service, the V-22 has been deployed in numerous missions around the world, including casualty evacuation, tactical recovery of aircraft and personnel, humanitarian assistance/disaster relief, resupply, VIP transport, and theater security cooperation.

"The versatile V-22 Osprey is in demand and indispensable among commanders worldwide," said Kristin Houston, vice president, Boeing Tiltrotor Programs and deputy director, Bell Boeing V-22 Program. "In order to improve readiness for our servicemen and women, we are significantly investing for the long term through modifications and upgrades to our V-22 factory in Philadelphia. Together with Bell Helicopter, we are proud of achieving this flight hour milestone. Our strategic alliance enables the continued success of this program."

"This 400,000-flight hour milestone is an incredible testament to the V-22’s leap-ahead capability and is a tribute to the men and women of Bell Helicopter and Boeing who build and support tiltrotor aircraft," said Vince Tobin, executive vice president of Military Programs at Bell Helicopter. "The Osprey brings unprecedented range, speed and survivability to the warfighter and will continue to excel in combat and in executing some of the most difficult humanitarian operations."

Source:  Boeing
Associated URL: boeing.com
Source Date: November 14, 2017
Posted: 11/16/2017

 

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