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USAF PREPARES FOR ALL MQ-9 FORCE
Thursday, February 23, 2017
Click image for a larger picture

Air Force to fly MQ-9 exclusively in early 2018

Source: US Air Force


Air Force to fly MQ-9 exclusively in early 2018

Source: US Air Force


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CREECH AFB, Nev. - For the past 21 years, the Air Force has flown the MQ-1 Predator remotely piloted aircraft in combat, and for the last 10, the MQ-9 Reaper. Combined with a skilled aircrew, these aircraft provide consistent support in daily engagements making an impact downrange.

While the MQ-1 has provided many years of service, the time has come for the Air Force to fly the more capable MQ-9 exclusively, and retire the MQ-1 in early 2018 to keep up with the continuously evolving battlespace environment.

The MQ-9 is better equipped than the MQ-1 due to its increased speed, high-definition sensors and the ability to carry more munitions. These combat attributes allow the MQ-9 to complete a wider array of mission sets which can help the Air Force stay prepared in the fight.

"When you ask about readiness, you have to ask ready for what?" said Col. Joseph, 432nd Operations Group commander. "If we talk about the things we could be ready for and what we should be asking our attack squadrons to do, then transitioning to an all MQ-9 force is imperative for readiness."

Current areas of responsibility calls upon combat RPAs for more precise close air support engagements from the attack squadrons, a considerable change from the days when RPAs were used solely for intelligence gathering and real-time reconnaissance.

"The reason that the MQ-9 has turned into a CAS platform, and this is the key point, is the fusion of two things," he said. "The first thing is the technology. We took an airplane and outfitted it with more raw power and capability, but then we did the other half and matted that technology with a professional aircrew."

Joseph also explained a third item which is the trust developed with combatant commanders and troops on the ground. This confidence combined with an ever-changing battlefield spawned increased demand and desire for more and more combat RPA support.

While the MQ-1 and the crews who flew them proved their weapons proficiency, it was never originally designed to carry weapons, resulting in a limited 200-pound payload. The demand for more attack capabilities exceeded the MQ-1s design.

"In the case of the MQ-1, I think we wanted more out of it but we were at a physical stop on the airplane and needed a new one," Joseph said.

The fresh MQ-9 design picked up where the MQ-1 left off, boasting a nearly 4,000-pound payload with the ability to carry both missiles and bombs.

These upgraded capabilities directly impact combat readiness and transitioning to just the MQ-9 will also help the aircrews stay primed and ready to go.

"Having a single aircraft buys more flexibility, simplifies training and logistics and gives our people more [career progression] opportunities," Joseph said. "I can't move my people in between squadrons without paying the penalty of having to train them on another aircraft."

The Air Force will no longer have to maintain a training pipeline or equipment on two separate aircraft which also eliminates the cost of operating two different airframes. Instead, everything will be specific to an all MQ-9 force.

Currently, the 20th Attack Squadron at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, is making the conversion from MQ-1 to MQ-9.

"Right now the plan is to stop flying the MQ-1 in 2018, and that means we need to get transitioned this year," said Lt. Col. James, 20th Attack Squadron commander. "As part of that we are going to stop flying the MQ-1 completely by July 1, 2017. We will gradually stand up our number of combat lines on the MQ-9 so by the end of the year we are only an MQ-9 squadron."

What is unique for James' squadron is some 20th ATKS aircrews are training on the MQ-9 for two to three months while home station crews are still flying the MQ-1 in daily combat missions overseas.

"For the better part of the last few months I've had upwards of 30 percent of my squadron gone at any time," James said. "It's been quite a challenge, but the motivation is very high to transition to this more capable airframe, and my squadron is excited to take it to combat."

"We're converting an MQ-1 squadron in combat 24/7/365 to an MQ-9 squadron in combat operations without taking a single day out of combat," Joseph said. "The herculean efforts done by the 20th ATKS is nothing short of remarkable."

The 20th ATKS and every unit which flew the MQ-1 achieved significant combat zone effects daily while laying the foundation for future combat RPAs.

"I think when we look at the legacy of the MQ-1 we're going to be scratching our heads wondering how we did so much with so little," Joseph said. "The men and women flying them starting with two squadrons took a science project and throughout many evolutionary changes made it what it is today."

The MQ-1 began as the RQ-1 Predator, an unarmed RPA flown by line-of-sight. Some changes include the adding of the Multi-Spectral Targeting system, the addition of weapons and remote-split operations capability.

"The MQ-1 is a great example where the Air Force took a technology demonstrator and turned it into a major weapons system having daily effects on the battlefield," James said. "We have found how to fly an imperfect weapons system very well, and I think we have maximized the effectiveness that we can get out of the MQ-1. I have no doubt that we will continue to find ways to be more effective in combat with the MQ-9."

James also said the desire for the real-time reconnaissance and persistent strike capabilities that combat RPA aircrew provide to the combatant commanders would never stop.

"We're hitting a home run by going to the MQ-9," James said. "We have made a difference."

Source:  U.S. Air Force
Associated URL: http://www.acc.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/tabid/5725/Article/1092894/usaf-prepar
Source Date: February 23, 2017
Posted: 02/24/2017

 
 
NRL'S UAV 'WINGMAN' TECHNOLOGY USED IN AIR COMBAT TRIALS
Wednesday, February 22, 2017
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Source: U.S. Naval Research


Source: U.S. Naval Research


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WASHINGTON - The Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence (NCARAI) at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) joined forces with Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) to continue work on the NRL-developed Tactical Battle Manager (TBM), a software system which uses intelligent agents to guide unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) which each serve as a 'wingman' in manned/unmanned teams, in simulated beyond-visual-range (BVR) air combat missions.

The TBM streamlines cross-platform coordination of manned and unmanned air combat teams to operate in highly contested environments. It allows a human operator to manage the UAVs on a team by coordinating their objectives and goals.

In these scenarios, operators control the lead air vehicle and communicate with autonomous agents, each of which is TBM-controlled. Each agent observes its environment through its sensors and executes actions to achieve its goals. These agents employ goal reasoning techniques, which allows them to dynamically self-select mission objectives to pursue, thus ensuring competent behavior when the operator is inaccessible and unanticipated situations arise -- for example, representing challenges or opportunities.

"The main idea here is if the UAV/wingman is left to its own devices, it has the ability to recognize when or how to change its goal or objective as the mission scenario unfolds," said Dr. David W. Aha, head, Adaptive Systems Section, NCARAI. "While some systems allow users to insert new goals or pre-program the selection of new goals, goal reasoning agents can dynamically select new goals to pursue that are not pre-programmed."

NRL's team integrated the TBM with AFRL's Analytical Framework for Simulation, Integration and Modeling (AFSIM) and NAVAIR's Next Generation Threat System (NGTS). AFSIM and NGTS are high fidelity BVR mission simulators which model air, land, and surface platforms -- including weapons and subsystems -- and are used daily by pilots in virtual training and testing systems.

Aha said in initial human studies with AFSIM, in counter-air scenarios, expert pilots said they had a positive attitude for trusting the TBM's ability to control a UAV under their command.

Development of the TBM took place within the framework of the Office of the Secretary of Defense-sponsored project Autonomy for Air Combat Missions, which is one of five multi-service research projects on autonomy technology that involves NRL researchers. NRL's intelligent agent for controlling unmanned vehicles is being used by AFRL and NAVAIR in simulated BVR air combat scenarios.

Source:  U.S. Navy
Associated URL: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=99006
Source Date: February 22, 2017
Author: Daniel Perry 
Posted: 02/23/2017

 
 
CATCHING UP WITH THALES' I-MASTER RADAR
Thursday, February 23, 2017
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I-MASTER Mounted On A Camcopter S-100 UAV

Source: Schiebel


I-MASTER Mounted On A Camcopter S-100 UAV

Source: Schiebel


Close
NEWTOWN, Conn. - Thales' I-MASTER is a lightweight, compact, surveillance radar with synthetic aperture radar (SAR), ground moving target indicator (GMTI), and maritime moving target indicator (MMTI) features, designed for use with a standardized 15-inch sensor mount. With these attributes, the I-MASTER is ideally suited for use on board small- to medium-sized unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and light manned aircraft, although the radar has been specified on aircraft ranging up to the medium-to-large transport size.

The I-MASTER's most important customer historically is the U.K., with acquisition in support of the Watchkeeper UAV. By the end of procurement in 2016, 54 Watchkeepers (56, including the two prototypes) were built for the U.K. While these were the last orders on record, further customers for the I-MASTER-equipped Watchkeeper are expected.

In addition to the U.K., France is a likely purchaser of the Watchkeeper, and has even operated a U.K. example during trials. Poland is another likely customer, with Thales proposing an I-MASTER-equipped Watchkeeper X to fulfill a UAV program requirement for the country. Further orders, whether from France, Poland, or elsewhere, are expected. However, any Watchkeeper-related I-MASTER production other than that destined for the U.K. should be considered speculative.

Demand for the I-MASTER aside from that driven by Watchkeeper production will also be present. The announcement of two additional I-MASTER-capable UAV platforms in 2013 extended the radar's opportunities. This was followed in 2014 by the revealing of the I-MASTER-capable Boeing Reconfigurable Airborne Multi-Intelligence System (RAMIS), and the June 2015 announcement that the radar had been integrated on board the Textron Scorpion Jet light attack/ISR platform.

I-MASTER production - although it is quite speculative - is forecast in support of the two UAV platforms, the King Air 350-based RAMIS, and other unspecified platforms. At least one sale of the RAMIS is already known, with Boeing announcing a multi-aircraft order, theoretically with the I-MASTER selected. After voicing interest, Canada could also emerge as an I-MASTER-equipped RAMIS operator in the future.

Over the next 10 years, the sum of known orders and potential orders is expected to require the production of nearly 200 I-MASTER radars.

Source:  Forecast International
Source Date: February 23, 2017
Author: C. Zachary Hofer  
Posted: 02/23/2017

 

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