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Missiles & Missile Systems
 
SHOULD TAO-205 BE ARMED?
Thursday, May 26, 2016

Source: US Navy

NEWTOWN, Conn - Historically, the Navy procured underway replenishment ships to support a two-stage approach to underway replenishment in which single-product "shuttle" ships (such as tankers, ammunition ships, and dry stores ships) would take their supplies from secure ports to relatively safe mid-ocean areas, where they would then transfer them to multiproduct "station" ships such as the T-AOEs and T-AORs. The T-AOEs and T-AORs would then travel to Navy carrier strike groups operating in higher-threat areas and transfer their combined supplies to the carrier strike group ships. As a result, single-product shuttle ships were equipped with lesser amounts of ship self-defense equipment, and T-AOEs and T-AORs were more heavily armed.

With the decrease in threat levels during the 1990s, the amount of ship self-defense equipment on the T-AOEs and T-AORs was reduced, and a single-stage approach to underway replenishment, in which oilers and dry stores ships took supplies from secure ports all the way to carrier strike group ships, was adopted. Threat levels are now increasing again and a decision has to be made as to what level; of self-defense capability will be needed by the TAO-205s. Building TAO-205s with more ship self-defense equipment than currently planned by the Navy could increase TAO-205 procurement costs by tens of millions of dollars per ship.

That's where the problem comes in. Even if the armament on the TAO-205s is increased to Cold War station ship levels, they will still be unable to defend themselves against any serious threat and will need to be escorted. If they need to be assigned escorts anyway, is the armament they can carry justified? A good case can be made that a significant increase in the unit costs of the ships will reduce the number that can be built on the budget envisaged. If, for example, two ships have to be cancelled because of the added expenditure on self defense equipment, it can be argued that a potential tacker has eliminated two ships from the fleet structure without firing a shot.

A compromise could be to return to the two-tier system with some of the TAO-205s being essentially unarmed shuttle ships while a small number are more heavily defended station ships. The TAO-205s are being designed with a "for but not with" provision for added defenses. This does not really address the main problem; if the ships need to be escorted anyway, why arm them?

Source:  www.forecastinternational.com
Source Date: May 26, 2016
Author: Stuart SLade, Senior Naval Analyst 
Posted: 05/26/2016

 
 
GEORGIA TO RECEIVE AIR DEFENSE SYSTEMS FROM FRANCE IN 2017
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Source: ThalesRaytheonSystems

TBILISI - Citing the Head of Georgia's Armed Forces General Staff, Vakhtang Kapanadze, Russian media has reported that Georgia will begin receiving air defense systems from France next year, in January 2017. Kapanadze noted that some components of the system may arrive earlier.

Kapanadze added that the Georgian Armed Forces would need to prepare a place for the military hardware. Georgian soldiers will train on the French systems over the upcoming months ahead of the deliveries.

Georgia and France first reached the agreements on air-defense systems and missiles during the summer of 2015. In June 2015, at the Paris Air Show, Georgia signed a contract with ThalesRaytheonSystems and then the following month signed an agreement with missile manufacturer MBDA.

The type of system Georgia is procuring has not been disclosed.

Source:  Sputnik International
Associated URL: http://sputniknews.com/military/20160525/1040211201/france-georgia-military-defe
Source Date: May 25, 2016
Posted: 05/25/2016

 
 
GEORGIA TO RECEIVE AIR DEFENSE SYSTEMS FROM FRANCE IN 2017
Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Source: MBDA

TBILISI - Citing the Head of Georgia's Armed Forces General Staff, Vakhtang Kapanadze, Russian media has reported that Georgia will begin receiving air defense systems from France next year, in January 2017. Kapanadze noted that some components of the system may arrive earlier.

Kapanadze added that the Georgian Armed Forces would need to prepare a place for the military hardware. Georgian soldiers will train on the French systems over the upcoming months ahead of the deliveries.

Georgia and France first reached the agreements on air-defense systems and missiles during the summer of 2015. In June 2015, at the Paris Air Show, Georgia signed a contract with ThalesRaytheonSystems and then the following month signed an agreement with missile manufacturer MBDA.

The type of system Georgia is procuring has not been disclosed.

Source:  Sputnik International
Associated URL: http://sputniknews.com/military/20160525/1040211201/france-georgia-military-defe
Source Date: May 25, 2016
Posted: 05/25/2016

 

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