Shopping Cart  |  Intelligence Center


HOME PRODUCTS & SERVICES MEDIA CENTER CONSULTING SERVICES DEMOS LOG IN CONTACT US

AEROSPACE & DEFENSE ELECTRONICS
AIRLINES, COMMERCIAL AVIATION & MAINTENANCE
AVIATION ENGINES, PROPULSION & AUXILIARY POWER UNITS
INDUSTRIAL & MARINE GAS TURBINES
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - ASIA, AUSTRALIA & PAC RIM/EURASIA
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - EUROPE
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - NORTH AMERICA
MILITARY AIRCRAFT
MILITARY VEHICLES, ORDNANCE, MUNITIONS, AMMUNITION & SMALL ARMS
MISSILES & MISSILE SYSTEMS
NAVAL SHIPS AND OPERATING SYSTEMS
NON-US AEROSPACE/DEFENSE COMPANIES & CONTRACTS
REGIONAL, BUSINESS & GENERAL AVIATION
ROTORCRAFT
SPACECRAFT, LAUNCH VEHICLES & SATELLITES
US AEROSPACE/DEFENSE COMPANIES & CONTRACTS
Drones and Unmanned Systems - Air, Sea, Land, Micro & Robot Systems
UTILITIES, ROTATING MACHINERY & POWER GENERATION

Military Vehicles, Ordnance, Munitions, Ammunition & Small Arms
 
READY RAILGUN: ELECTROMAGNETIC WEAPON PRIMED FOR OPERATIONAL DEMOS
Tuesday, July 25, 2017
ARLINGTON, Va. - At the recent Naval Future Force Science and Technology Expo, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) announced that the Navy’s electromagnetic railgun is out of the laboratory and ready for field demonstrations at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division’s new railgun Rep-Rate Test Site at Terminal Range.

Initial rep-rate fires (repetition rate of fires) of multi-shot salvos already have been successfully conducted at low muzzle energy. The next test sequence calls for safely increasing launch energy, firing rates and salvo size. Railgun rep-rate testing will be at 20 megajoules by the end of the summer and at 32 megajoules by next year. To put this in perspective, one megajoule is the equivalent of a one-ton vehicle moving at 160 miles per hour.

"Railguns and other directed-energy weapons are the future of maritime superiority," said Dr. Thomas Beutner, head of ONR's Naval Air Warfare and Weapons Department. "The U.S. Navy must be the first to field this leap-ahead technology and maintain the advantage over our adversaries."

The revolutionary railgun relies on a massive electrical pulse, rather than gunpowder or other chemical propellants, to launch projectiles at distances over 100 nautical miles-and at speeds that exceed Mach 6, or six times the speed of sound. That velocity allows projectiles to rely on kinetic energy for maximum effect, and reduces the amount of high explosives needed on ships.

The railgun shoots the high-velocity projectile (HVP), a next-generation, low-drag, guided projectile that can be used in different gun systems. With its increased velocity, precision guidance and extended range, the railgun realizes the full range of the HVP’s scalable lethality. Together, both technologies will enable naval forces to address threats in the mission areas of surface fire support, anti-air and anti-surface warfare.

The Navy currently is developing and testing railgun barrels capable of firing many rounds per minute with a tactically relevant barrel life-as well as the associated power and auxiliary systems needed to make that possible. In addition, the weapon’s power system now is small enough to fit aboard current and future U.S. Navy ships. These products, when matured, will create much more capable warships.

The railgun is expected to be very cost-effective, while adding offensive and defensive depth. Compared to traditional guns on Navy ships, the railgun offers greater range, higher velocity and a deeper magazine.

"The railgun will be an effective deterrent against growing and increasingly complex threats," said Beutner. "Its power level surpasses traditional gun technology, and it reduces explosive ship-board risks to Sailors and Marines at sea."

Source:  Office of Naval Research
Associated URL: onr.navy.mil
Source Date: July 25, 2017
Author: Warren Duffie Jr., ONR 
Posted: 07/26/2017

 
 
TURKEY FILLS LONG-RANGE AIR DEFENSE REQUIREMENT WITH RUSSIAN S-400
Tuesday, July 25, 2017
Click image for a larger picture

Source: Russian MoD


Source: Russian MoD


Close
ANKARA - In a move certain to evoke political tensions within the NATO Alliance, Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced on July 25 that negotiations between his country and Russia regarding the procurement of the S-400 air-defense missile system had concluded and that a deal was in place.

Turkey has sought a long-range air and missile defense system for years through its T-LORAMIDS program, which was officially launched in 2007. But that program foundered when Ankara announced its selection of a Chinese-derived alternative to the Russian S-300 system, the FD-2000 export version of the HQ-9, in 2013. Turkey's choice of the Chinese system over two offers from NATO-standard platforms - the Franco-Italian Eurosam Aster-30 and Raytheon theater ballistic missile defense variant of the Patriot, the Guidance Enhanced Missile-TBM, or GEM-T - immediately elicited pushback from U.S. and European NATO allies of Turkey, who feared integrating Chinese hardware and software into NATO's own Alliance-aligned air defense network.

Now it seems Turkey will move ahead with the Russian S-400 Triumf, a road-mobile, long-range surface-to-air missile system with a range of up to 250 miles. This would mark the first such instance of a NATO member purchasing the Russian-made system, though neighboring Greece has up to 12 batteries of the earlier-generation S-300PMU Favorit it acquired in a 2007 swap with Cyprus. These systems are in severe need of an upgrade in order to be functional and Greece has remained in prolonged negotiations with Russia since 2015 regarding acquiring new missiles and maintenance services for them.

While Turkey may be acquiring the S-400 as a near-term solution to its long-range air and missile defense needs, it is also running a parallel initiative with Eurosom to research, develop and coproduce a Turkish variant of the Aster-30 SAMP/T (sol-air moyenne portée terrestre or surface-to-air medium range/land) with full-scale development set to get underway in 2019. The signing of that agreement was announced by Turkey's defense minister Fikri Isikat at a Bastille Day reception at the French embassy in Ankara on July 14.

Source:  Daily Sabah
Associated URL: https://www.dailysabah.com/politics/2017/07/26/s-400-agreement-with-russia-a-done-deal-erdogan-says
Source Date: July 25, 2017
Author: D. Darling, Europe Analyst 
Posted: 07/26/2017

 
 
UDRI AWARDED $43M CONTRACT TO SUPPORT AIR FORCE IN NONMETALLIC MATERIALS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Friday, July 21, 2017
Click image for a larger picture

UDRI researcher primes an aircraft wing during repair

Source: UDRI


UDRI researcher primes an aircraft wing during repair

Source: UDRI


Close
DAYTON, Ohio - The University of Dayton Research Institute has been awarded a $43 million-ceiling Air Force contract to perform a comprehensive program of research and development in nonmetallic materials for maintenance, repair and manufacture of Air Force air, space and ground vehicles. The seven-year contract supports the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Systems Support Division, and was awarded with an initial $40,000 task order.

The contract allows UDRI researchers on campus and at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base to continue a wide variety of activities in adhesives, sealants, elastomers, textiles, composites and other materials, work they’ve performed for the Air Force for nearly 40 years through a series of contracts.

"Our goal is to provide research, development and expertise in nonmetallic materials, processes and new technologies designed to improve systems performance and capability, while reducing risk, cost and environmental impact," said Dan McCray, leader of UDRI’s Aerospace Materials Sustainment group in Nonstructural Materials?, who will serve as principal investigator for the work. "We work closely with AFRL engineers to identify, evaluate and even develop new materials and application processes for legacy and future aircraft. We also provide assistance in transitioning t??hose new technologies into practical application."

Nonmetallic materials such as sealants and elastomers are used throughout aircraft and other vehicles as fluid barriers, gap fillers, vibration suppression and other applications that require a nonstructural material. In this particular program, researchers will also work with adhesives and composite materials, which are used in place of metallic materials to help decrease aircraft weight.

"Nonmetallic materials are incorporated into an aircraft during manufacture under very controlled conditions, meaning that the temperature, humidity and other ambient conditions in the factory are ideal for the processes," McCray said. "But when repairs are needed to aircraft, they’re made ‘in the field’ at one of the Air Force bases, where environmental conditions for repair are not as easily controlled. So we look for the best materials to use and determine the optimal processes needed for good repairs in the environment in which they are made."

In addition to evaluating existing materials and processes to find the best technology for each application, researchers are often asked to evaluate new or emerging materials being considered for use in the manufacture of future aircraft. "New materials being developed for the commercial market may also work well for Air Force applications, but first we need to determine whether they will meet Air Force specifications," McCray said.

Source:  University of Dayton Research Institute
Associated URL: udayton.edu
Source Date: July 21, 2017
Posted: 07/26/2017

 

NOTICE TO USERS

Warranty: Forecast International makes no guarantees as to the veracity or accuracy of the information provided. It warrants only that the information, which has been obtained from multiple sources, has been researched and screened to the best of the ability of our staff within the limited time constraints. Forecast International encourages all clients to use multiple sources of information and to conduct their own research on source data prior to making important decisions. All URLs listed were active as of the time the information was recorded. Some hyperlinks may have become inactive since the time of publication.

Technical Support: Phone (203)426-0800 e-mail support@forecast1.com

Subscription Information: Phone (203)426-0800 or (800)451-4975; FAX (203)426-0223 (USA) or e-mail sales@forecast1.com

Aerospace/Defense News Highlights is published by Forecast International, 22 Commerce Road, Newtown CT 06470 USA. Articles that list Forecast International as the source are Copyrighted © 2017. Reproduction in any form, or transmission by electronic or other means, is prohibited without prior approval from the publisher.

Forecast International invites all interested companies to submit their announcements and press releases for review and inclusion in our Intelligence Letters.

Contact: Ray Peterson, Director of Research
E-Mail: Ray.Peterson@forecast1.com
Phone: 800-451-4975
FAX: 203-270-8919



HOME PRODUCTS & SERVICES MEDIA CENTER CONTACT US PRIVACY STATEMENT TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Forecast International © 2017 22 Commerce Rd Newtown, CT 06470 USA Phone: 203.426.0800 Toll-Free: 800.451.4975 (USA & Canada) Fax: 203.426.0223 info@forecast1.com