Shopping Cart  |  Intelligence Center


HOME PRODUCTS & SERVICES MEDIA CENTER CONSULTING SERVICES DEMOS LOG IN CONTACT US

AEROSPACE & DEFENSE ELECTRONICS
AIRLINES, COMMERCIAL AVIATION & MAINTENANCE
AVIATION ENGINES, PROPULSION & AUXILIARY POWER UNITS
INDUSTRIAL & MARINE GAS TURBINES
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - ASIA, AUSTRALIA & PAC RIM/EURASIA
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - EUROPE
INTERNATIONAL MILITARY MARKETS & BUDGETS - NORTH AMERICA
MILITARY AIRCRAFT
MILITARY VEHICLES, ORDNANCE, MUNITIONS, AMMUNITION & SMALL ARMS
MISSILES & MISSILE SYSTEMS
NAVAL SHIPS AND OPERATING SYSTEMS
NON-US AEROSPACE/DEFENSE COMPANIES & CONTRACTS
REGIONAL, BUSINESS & GENERAL AVIATION
ROTORCRAFT
SPACECRAFT, LAUNCH VEHICLES & SATELLITES
US AEROSPACE/DEFENSE COMPANIES & CONTRACTS
Drones and Unmanned Systems - Air, Sea, Land, Micro & Robot Systems
UTILITIES, ROTATING MACHINERY & POWER GENERATION

International Military Markets & Budgets - North America
 
U.S. ARMY TO INVEST $269 MILLION ON KEY SIGNAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEM
Thursday, August 25, 2016
Click image for a larger picture

Members of U.S. Army Signal Company

Source: U.S. Army


Members of U.S. Army Signal Company

Source: U.S. Army


Close
NEWTOWN, Conn. - The next several years should see steady U.S. Army procurement and advancement of the PROPHET Enhanced tactical signals intelligence system, driven by the constant demand for vehicle and soldier protection. PROPHET provides all-weather, EW and near real-time intelligence and jamming support for division and maneuver commanders.

The PROPHET Enhanced version has an open architecture, which allows the Army to update the system much faster and more efficiently than possible with older versions of PROPHET. The system provides force protection and situational awareness support to U.S. Army Brigade Combat Team (BCT) and Expeditionary - Military Intelligence Brigade (E-MIB) commanders.

The U.S. Army will spend $269 million on procurement and enhancements for the program for the program through 2021. This funding will support integration of the next-generation, manpack receiver signal-of-interest (SOI) enhancement for Prophet Enhanced.

A report on PROPHET is available from Forecast International.

Source:  Forecast International
Associated URL: http://www.forecastinternational.com
Source Date: August 25, 2016
Author: A. Dardine, Defense Electronics 
Posted: 08/25/2016

 
 
USAF SHIFTS FOCUS TO DEVELOPMENT OF NEW SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM
Thursday, August 25, 2016
Click image for a larger picture

Artist's rendition of a WGS satellite

Source: Boeing


Artist's rendition of a WGS satellite

Source: Boeing


Close
NEWTOWN, Conn. - With demand for bandwidth continuing to grow, the Air Force will take delivery of a total of 10 WGS satellites. All six of the originally planned WGS satellites have been paid for and are operational. The seventh satellite is also in orbit. Three more satellites will be delivered by 2019.

The Air Force has had success gathering other countries to participate in the program. Australia has contributed funds to WGS-6, while Canada, Denmark, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and New Zealand have all contributed funds toward WGS-9. In return, all of these countries will gain access to capacity from the entire system. There is some talk that the Air Force will put WGS-9 and WGS-10 into storage until a later date. However, due to support from other countries, continuing need for satellite bandwidth, and Congressional support for the WGS program, the two satellites in question are expected to be launched as planned.

As the WGS program moves toward completion, the Air Force has begun to shift its focus towards the development of a new system. Launches of WGS satellites began in 2007, meaning replacements will be needed starting in the early 2020s. The Air Force has also expressed interest in launching a three-satellite constellation to supplement WGS satellites to meet the Pentagon's ever-increasing need for bandwidth.

Source:  Forecast International
Associated URL: www.forecastinternational.com
Source Date: August 25, 2016
Author: B. Ostrove, Analyst 
Posted: 08/25/2016

 
 
DUNFORD DETAILS IMPLICATIONS OF TODAY’S THREATS ON TOMORROW’S STRATEGY
Tuesday, August 23, 2016
Click image for a larger picture

Gen.Dunford addresses National Defense University students

Source: US DoD


Gen.Dunford addresses National Defense University students

Source: US DoD


Close
FORT McNAIR, D.C. - National security leaders must be able to confront today’s threats, and they must develop and maintain the personnel, strategies and equipment needed for an ever more uncertain world, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff told the new class at the National Defense University today.

Marine Corps Gen. Joe Dunford also shared with the members of the class of 2017 his thoughts on the strategic landscape, and the implications to the joint force.

Dunford agrees with assessments that the world is in the most uncertain time since the end of World War II. Still, the U.S. military "is recruiting and retaining quality people," the chairman said.

"Across the board," he added, "they are focused. They are committed. They are high quality."

There are signs of wear in some military specialties and Dunford cited a pilot shortage and the near constant deployments of special operators and other small, but crucial specialties, specifically. But, he noted the closer to a combat environment, the higher the morale.

Assessing Risk

"In the environment we are in today, with the complexity and volatility and variety of challenges we have, how do we assess risk?" he asked. "How do we assess the capabilities or capacities that must exist in the joint force? A part of this is also how to prepare for the unexpected."

The threat baseline, he said, is four-plus-one: Russia, China, Iran, North Korea and violent extremism. Four are nation states that can cause varying degrees of concern. The fifth threat, terrorism, can flare up in any part of the world.

"We use those four state actors and one nonstate actor ... to get an appreciation for where is the force relative to where it needs to be," Dunford said.

He addressed each of the threats starting with the campaign against the core of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in Iraq and Syria. The military campaign against core ISIL is going well, he said. Iraqi security forces have proved in Fallujah and Ramadi that they can take on ISIL and win. They have set the stage for the battle against the terror group in Mosul -- Iraq’s second-largest city and the largest city anywhere under ISIL control.

Fighting ISIL in Iraq

Now, he said, "it is no longer the military campaign that is going to be the determining factor in the success in Iraq. The interactions of governments in Iraq, the role of Shia militia forces, the relationship of the Peshmerga in the north with the Shia and government -- all those things have to be sorted out."

Meanwhile, the United States is supporting 14,000 Arab fighters and upwards of 30,000 Kurds during the counter-ISIL campaign in Syria, said Dunford, who noted there’s been much ground retaken there from ISIL.

ISIL in Libya

ISIL is not limited to Iraq and Syria and the United States is helping government forces in Libya strike at ISIL in Sirte, Dunford said. The U.S. needs to eliminate the group from the region for ISIL in Libya could be the headquarters for the group throughout Africa and for attacks into Europe, he said.

Dunford said the counter-ISIL campaign in Libya is making progress. "The trajectory that ISIL was on in Libya in January and February was concerning to me, but it is less so today," the chairman said.

ISIL is also in Afghanistan, West Africa and is trying to gain adherents in Southeast Asia. The United States will confront the group wherever it goes, Dunford said.

The chairman discussed the capabilities that Russia and China are developing. "When I look at Russia, they are modernizing their nuclear enterprise, they are modernizing their submarine force, they are modernizing their conventional capabilities," he said. All this is being done, he said, despite significant demographic and economic challenges facing Russia.

The U.S. competitive advantage in many of these areas is getting smaller, the chairman said.

Russian Actions

Dunford said he’s concerned about Russia’s behavior, including its annexation of Crimea, its actions in Eastern Ukraine, it threats to Georgia and Moldova, and its aid to Syria.

Russia is engaging in these actions in an attempt, Dunford said, to "undermine the most successful alliance in history -- the NATO alliance."

He added: "From a U.S. perspective, I would tell you I believe our center of gravity as a nation, through a security lens, is the network of alliances. Russia is trying to erode that."

Russia and China are separately concentrating on anti-access, area denial strategies, but for similar ends, the chairman said.

The Question of China

China is a bit more opaque, Dunford said. China has invested significant sums in building up its military, including its nuclear enterprise. Its actions in the South China Sea are cause for concern to the United States, the chairman said.

Meanwhile, Iran is trying to spread its influence across the Middle East, he said, and must be carefully monitored. And, the chairman said, North Korea is still building nuclear capabilities and intercontinental missiles and is the most unpredictable nation on the list.

All these risk assessments have implications for the joint force. The first, Dunford said, is the United States must have balanced capabilities. "In other words, we have to have capabilities that range from the nuclear down to conventional and special operations capabilities," he said. "We as a nation with the challenges out there cannot afford not to have a robust capability."

Another implication is the United States has to do better at integrating all aspects of the government into strategy and integrating allies and partners into plans, the chairman said.

Finally, the chairman believes any disagreement has the potential to grow to a transregional, multi-domain conflict. He cited the example of North Korea. In the 1990s, it was possible that if the armistice broke down, the conflict could be limited to the Korean Peninsula. With ballistic missiles, the cyber threat and conventional attacks, any conflict with North Korea would soon escalate to include the rest of U.S. Pacific Command, U.S. Northern Command, U.S. Strategic Command and U.S. Cyber Command.

This calls for a much greater degree of strategic integration in the future, Dunford said. The decision-making processes need to be streamlined, and leaders need a common operational picture. All this requires a strategic framework to build the plans for global operations.

Source:  US DoD
Associated URL: defense.gov
Source Date: August 23, 2016
Author: Jim Garamone DoD News 
Posted: 08/25/2016

 

NOTICE TO USERS

Warranty: Forecast International makes no guarantees as to the veracity or accuracy of the information provided. It warrants only that the information, which has been obtained from multiple sources, has been researched and screened to the best of the ability of our staff within the limited time constraints. Forecast International encourages all clients to use multiple sources of information and to conduct their own research on source data prior to making important decisions. All URLs listed were active as of the time the information was recorded. Some hyperlinks may have become inactive since the time of publication.

Technical Support: Phone (203)426-0800 e-mail support@forecast1.com

Subscription Information: Phone (203)426-0800 or (800)451-4975; FAX (203)426-0223 (USA) or e-mail sales@forecast1.com

Aerospace/Defense News Highlights is published by Forecast International, 22 Commerce Road, Newtown CT 06470 USA. Articles that list Forecast International as the source are Copyrighted © 2016. Reproduction in any form, or transmission by electronic or other means, is prohibited without prior approval from the publisher.

Forecast International invites all interested companies to submit their announcements and press releases for review and inclusion in our Intelligence Letters.

Contact: Ray Peterson, Director of Research
E-Mail: Ray.Peterson@forecast1.com
Phone: 800-451-4975
FAX: 203-270-8919



HOME PRODUCTS & SERVICES MEDIA CENTER CONTACT US PRIVACY STATEMENT TERMS AND CONDITIONS

Forecast International © 2016 22 Commerce Rd Newtown, CT 06470 USA Phone: 203.426.0800 Toll-Free: 800.451.4975 (USA & Canada) Fax: 203.426.0223 info@forecast1.com